Living and Coping With Diabetes

Diabetes and Hearing Loss

Diabetes has become so common in the U.S. that there may be a danger of losing sight of just how serious a disease it is. In the diabetic community, there has long been a saying that diabetes won’t kill you, but its complications will. The list of complications is long and includes, heart disease, nerve damage, kidney failure, foot and leg amputation, blindness, Alzheimer’s and a host of others. And, while the saying about diabetes not killing you may be catchy, the truth, according to the American Diabetes Association, is that, “Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.” (more…)

Urinary Incontinence and Diabetes

There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)

The Fundamental Differences Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Most people know that diabetes involves the inability to control glucose, or blood sugar, by not producing enough insulin or not managing it correctly. This leads to elevated levels of glucose in the body, which can result in very serious complications, such as heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, hardening of the arteries, foot and leg amputation and blindness. (more…)

Foods That Cause a Spike in Blood Sugar

Understanding how food affects blood sugar level and constantly monitoring it is a way of life for those with diabetes. This largely involves the balance between the amount of insulin currently in the body at any given time and how the foods we eat change that it. At center stage for this daily drama are carbohydrates. Knowing the difference between how the various types of carbohydrates are processed by the body is key to maintaining blood sugar levels. (more…)

Ways to Lower Your A1C Level

The A1C is a common blood test that measures the amount of glucose that is attached to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. It has a variety of other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1 and is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Unlike the traditional blood glucose test, the A1C does not require fasting, and blood can be drawn at any time of day. It is hoped that this will result in more people getting tested and decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes, which is currently estimated to be more than 7 million adults in the U.S. (more…)

Are Pedicures Safe If You Have Diabetes?

Pedicures may seem like a modern indulgence, but they actually date back more than 4,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. The word pedicure comes from the Latin “pes” for foot and “cura” for care. Originally practiced to prevent foot problems, today, more popular than ever, pedicures combine nail and skin care with a relaxing and self-pampering experience enjoyed not only by women but more and more by men, also.   (more…)

Should I Take Steroids If I Have Diabetes?

In a perfect world, the answer to the question “should someone with diabetes take steroids?” would be a simple “no”. Of course, not only do we not live in a perfect world, there are also few simple answers for diabetics. Steroids can play havoc with blood sugar levels, but they can also be the best choice in treating some very serious conditions. So, perhaps the better answer would be “maybe” with the added caveat of making sure you are aware of the consequences and prepared to be proactive in managing them.   (more…)

Dealing with Insulin Self Injections at Work

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes are being diagnosed among U.S. adults, aged 18 years or older, per year. A large percentage of these individuals, as well as the other 23 million adults already diagnosed, are employed outside the home. Depending on the stage and severity of the disease, many of these will require insulin during their work day, which will may mean giving themselves injections. For the newly diagnosed, this can create a fairly significant level of anxiety that is best dealt with sooner rather than later. Knowing one’s rights and best practices are the first step. (more…)

Can Medical Marijuana Help with Diabetes?

Weed. Pot. Mary Jane. Cannabis. Whatever you call marijuana and wherever you stand on its legalization, it is hard to imagine that there is anyone unaware of the controversy raging around this rather nondescript plant. In the United States, medical marijuana has been decriminalized in more than half of the states but is still classified as a federal crime.

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How Can I Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

If you are coming across this post, there is a good chance that you or someone you love has been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is by no means a death sentence, but it necessitates some pretty major lifestyle changes, so it is good to keep yourself informed of the best practices for avoiding type 2 diabetes.

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